Westlake Royal Building Products Adds Board & Batten Profile to Cedar Renditions Siding

Cedar Renditions Board and Batten

Westlake Royal Building Products announced the addition of a Board & Batten siding profile to its award-winning Cedar Renditions by Royal® aluminum siding line

The Cedar Renditions™ Board & Batten siding has a unique woodgrain look that can be used as an accent to enhance any exterior facade. The Board & Batten profile can also be a beautiful complement to the existing Cedar Renditions siding, together with the trim and accessories. 

“With the previous success of this line with architects in both the U.S. and Canada, we are thrilled to now include a Board & Batten profile that enables designers and builders to easily achieve a modern or classic design exterior with premium aluminum products,” said Steve Booz, Vice President of Marketing for Westlake Royal Building Products. 

In addition, and exclusive only to the Canadian market, two new on-trend dark blue shades, Marine Blue and Midnight Surf, will also be added to the Cedar Renditions trim coil color options.

Cedar Renditions is a sleek and modern aluminum accent siding that provides exceptional curb appeal without the maintenance or flammability issues of wood. In addition to offering a modern-looking, distinctive and unique appearance, it offers several benefits:

• Unique traditional woodgrains and premium multi-tonal woodgrain designs
• Vertical siding alternative to complement a façade’s design
• PVDF paint technology for exceptional fade resistance and durability 
• Moisture proof
• Easy to install
• Non-flammable

Cedar Renditions by Royal is backed by a 25-year Prorated Limited Warranty and can be purchased through select distributors across the U.S. and Canada. For more information about product specifications and warranty terms, or to locate a distributor, visit https://royalbuildingproducts.com/cedarrenditions.

Cedar Renditions: Modern Cedar Meets Low Maintenance

Cedar Renditions aluminum siding

It’s the combination every homeowner craves: The beautiful look of stained cedar without the hassles or maintenance. Cedar Renditions™ siding delivers these attributes and then some to the benefit of consumers, builders, and architects alike.

The modern-looking, high-end siding comes in a variety of woodgrain colors with a robust, fade-resistant PVDF top coat. Along with three traditional hues, the siding comes in four premium colors boasting multiple tonalities for an even deeper woodgrain look. Unlike some competing materials, the panels’ unique overlap helps achieve longer lengths for a seamless appearance. This along with the flat face panel and clean horizontal joints help create a truly contemporary look.

Cedar Renditions is available in 6-inch siding ideal for accents alongside stone, stucco, and brick, and in a complementary soffit for the perfect finishing touch. A wide range of matching accessories and trim coil further enhance the project.

Moisture-proof and rust-resistant, Cedar Renditions is suitable for any market, but is especially desirable in coastal areas including Seattle, Chicago, and New England. The siding is impervious to cold, insect-proof, is non-flammable, and withstands winds up to 200 mph. It’s also 100% recyclable.

For contractors, Cedar Renditions offers simple, straightforward installation similar to other panel-style claddings. Corner posts and J-channels provide starting points, then panels install easily with a drop-in interlock system. Available graphic guides help ensure pattern randomness for a truly authentic look.  

Cedar Renditions carries a 25-year pro-rated limited warranty.

Learn more about Cedar Renditions here.

8 Quick Tips to Work Efficiently

As labor challenges abound and schedules remain tight, trimming inefficiencies out of your installation processes can add up to critical time and money savings. Every contractor has their tricks for eliminating wasted steps without sacrificing a quality install. Here are a few best practices to work efficiently.

1. When installing vinyl siding, be sure to leverage available accessories that can reduce detail work while ensuring a finished look. These include:
• Dual undersill trim: This is used the same way as standard finish trim, such as under windows or at the top of the wall, but because it has two slots instead of one, there’s no guesswork as to whether you need to bump out the finish trim to keep the siding angles correct.

• Board and Batten Trim: Use this to separate the courses of vertical siding since the profiles can’t overlap at the seam. The Board and Batten Trim has built-in flashing, making installation easy as well as functional.

• Shake Finish Trim: Designed for Westlake Royal Building Products’ Portsmouth Shake Panel, Shake Finish Trim secures ripped panels under windows and doors or at the top of a wall. Use a snap-lock tool to create snap lugs about every 6” to 8”, then snap the panel into the Shake Finish Trim and lock the snap lugs into place securely.

2. If you have a damaged vinyl corner, you can replace it without removing any siding. Cut and remove the existing face, leaving the channels. Cut and remove the face of the new corner, leaving the return. Then snap the new corner over the channel of the old.

3. When installing CraneBoard® Solid Core Siding® insulated vinyl siding, keep the ends of the foam no more than ¼” from each other to retain the insulation value, while giving the panels enough room to expand and contract. Pull and use your measurements from the foam instead of the panel. Both the panel and the foam will be the correct length.

4. For deck stairs, Fulton Fine Woodworks created a wooden jig that fits between the deck boards and shows precisely where to pre-drill for screw placement, eliminating the need to measure. See it here.

5. Need to find center but working with an uneven number? Simple rotate your tape measure, like so: https://www.instagram.com/p/CfnFg3lJAHT/

6. Tim Uhler, lead carpenter at Pioneer Builders, often creates makeshift tools that can do tasks more quickly while reducing user strain and fatigue. For example, instead of bending to cut sheathing while framing walls on the ground, he mounted a floor scraper to a router with spiral bit: https://www.instagram.com/reel/CcuBh83gBzS/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

7. To lift heavy beams into place, Uhler made a beam wrench out of plywood: https://www.instagram.com/p/CZIt_NnKiU3/

8. When painting trim, Robert Cripps Construction sprays aerosol hairspray on the painters tape, helping to prevent bleed-through.

Want more pro tips to work efficiently? Check out our compilation on Instagram. Have a tip that can help others in the trades? Post it to Instagram and tag us at @WestlakeRoyalPros.

What Pros Should Know About Siding and Housewrap

The wall system is one of the most critical areas for preserving the home’s durability and longevity. And it’s just that—a system. Each part of the wall, from the cladding to the housewrap to the flashing, plays a role in keeping the wall system protected and dry. As such, it’s important to note that different types of siding may require different drainage systems behind them and, therefore, work best with specific types of weather resistant barriers (WRBs).

Cladding Material Influences Housewrap Selection

At minimum, one of the first steps in ensuring your wall works as a system is to follow local code requirements as well as instructions from your housewrap manufacturer and guidelines from your siding manufacturer for the specific cladding or claddings. The siding’s material and how it installs on the wall both factor into the decision of what WRB to choose.

For example, a wood or wood-based siding is much more prone to moisture absorption and will require a robust rainscreen system to ensure bulk water drains away quickly instead of absorbing into the siding, which can lead to premature failure. TruExterior® poly-ash siding, which is resistant to moisture but installs flat against the wall, is recommended to be paired with at minimum a drainable housewrap, which provides more drainage than a flat housewrap but less than a full rainscreen.

The Vinyl Siding Institute requires installing vinyl siding, such as that from Royal® Siding or Exterior Portfolio® with a weather resistive barrier. Because vinyl and polypropylene sidings are designed to allow the material underneath to breathe, they can be installed over a flat housewrap unless local codes require otherwise.

Housewrap, siding
This home features Royal® Vinyl’s Woodland siding in Heritage Blue and Portsmouth® Shake & Shingle accents.

Some cladding types feature a rainscreen already built in, as is the case with Versetta Stone® panelized stone siding. Because of this, the minimum recommendation is one layer of #15 felt.

Pay Attention to Transitions

With the growing trend of multi-textured facades, you’ll need to accommodate each type of cladding. When installing two products together that have different recommendations for housewraps and rainscreens, you’ll need to either wrap the entire façade in the more robust system or plan the wall system accordingly so that the corresponding weather barrier is positioned under each cladding and properly transitions from material to material per guidelines from the WRB and cladding manufacturers.

housewrap at transitions between vinyl siding and stone veneer
Versetta Stone’s wainscot cap/sill creates an ideal transition between the Versetta Stone panelized stone half wall and the Foundry Grayne siding above. Install flashing over the wainscot cap’s nailing fin and then shingle the other cladding over top to ensure water sheds off of the sill. Leave a small gap between the cladding and the stone, per each cladding’s installation instructions.

Flash Well

Follow all recommendations for flashing, as well, as some materials may require or recommend more robust flashing at the seams to prevent bulk water intrusion. Your installation instructions may also provide guidelines for step flashing along roof and wall lines to ensure water drains away rather than becoming trapped in the wall system.

Consult With Experts

Siding materials will shed the bulk of the water before it can reach the underlying wall assembly, but their main job is to make the house look good. Work closely with your housewrap and flashing manufacturer to ensure the wall system can properly manage any liquid water that may end up behind the siding so that the wall structure stays dry. Designing and installing a proper wall system can help protect the structure and its occupants while safeguarding the longevity of the home. 

Have questions about your siding installation and exterior wall system? Connect with us here.

Tips and Trends for Choosing Exterior Colors

Royal Siding and Atlas Stone on farmhouse

Whether styled in classic colors that never fade from favor or featuring trendy pops of color, the exterior façade sets the tone—and critical first impression—for the home. With tastes changing at a near-constant rate, what’s the best way to choose exterior color combinations that meet today’s needs without feeling dated quickly? We checked in with Kate Smith, color expert and president of Sensational Color, to get the latest tips and tricks for exteriors.

What Colors Are on Trend?

As often happens with exterior trends, some familiar looks remain popular amid a few emerging options.

“We’re seeing so much interest in very dark paints, which is surprising,” Smith says, including black, deep gray, olive green, and blue gray, as well as colors with dark undertones, such as green-black.

Smith says that classic grays and other timeless neutrals continue to trend, along with bright white or off-white for the popular Modern Farmhouse look.

Material colors are coming into play, as well, she notes, with stained wood accents, such as beams, appearing on homes where they may not have in the past. Metal is popping up in similar ways, from steel beams to glass-and-metal contemporary-style garage doors.

And, of course, mixing materials, textures, and colors continues to be popular, offering homeowners the opportunity to differentiate their façade and add an extra touch of personality.

Best Practices for Combining Exterior Colors

Indeed, multi-color and -texture facades are a key trend right now, but pulling it off well isn’t always easy. Smith recommends starting with the fixed elements—the roof and any brick or stone materials—and ensuring they work together.

“When those harmonize, it’s harder to go wrong with siding and trim,” she says.

From there, select exterior colors that work well alongside them. For example, if the stone façade has a lot of grays or browns, choosing a paint or pre-finished siding color that coordinates will ensure a more cohesive look.

When considering neutrals, keep in mind that not all beiges and grays are the same. They likely have undertones, such as brown or even purple, that alter their look. When in doubt, look at the grout, which can clue you in to a coordinating neutral hue.

“Your house is telling you what color to paint it, you just have to listen,” Smith says.

Another thing to keep in mind is the role of light in the appearance of the home exterior. Color in the paint store will likely look very different—from washed out to more vibrant—in daylight. When narrowing down color selections, advise your customers to take samples to the project site to see how the colors look in the environment in which they will be used.

Avoiding Common Mistakes With Exterior Colors

Smith is quick to note that “there are no bad colors, just some unfortunate combinations.”

Here are a few ways to avoid an exterior façade that stands out for the wrong reasons:

• Don’t go too vibrant: Jewel tones and other vibrant colors are beautiful, but can be overwhelming in large amounts on the home’s exterior. Choose a toned-down or grayed-out version of the hue to avoid an over-the-top, dated look.

• Don’t go too bold: Similarly, a full façade of purple or chartreuse may stand out too much and even affect resale value. The entry door, shutters, and other accents are great spots for those bolder hues and personalized style expressions, adding that pop of color without feeling overwhelming.

• Don’t aim for the perfect match: It might be tempting to precisely match the siding color to the brick, stone, or roof. But it’s nearly impossible to do and can create an off-putting look. Even if perfectly matched, materials weather differently over time and likely won’t look the same for long. If similar colors are desired, go for a lighter or darker shade to create a blended look instead.


When in doubt, consider timeless combinations. These might include white siding with black trim and a red door or gray walls with a black slate roof. Neutral hues are always a safe bet, as well. “A great gray or a great beige will never go out of style,” Smith says. She notes that neutrals are particularly helpful for multi-textured facades, acting as a bridge between materials and helping draw attention to visual focal points like a stone bump-out or dramatic copper gutters. “If color blends well, it becomes the backdrop.”

Also, be sure to leverage Westlake Royal Building Products’ color tools, including:

Royal® Vinyl Siding Color Combinations guide

Exterior Portfolio® Color Combinations guide

Celect® Cellular Composite Siding Color Combinations guide

•  Virtual Remodeler, HomePlay, and Dream Designer online visualizers that allow you to preview different product and color combinations on an image of the home or a similar home.

To learn more strategies for choosing exterior colors, download Smith’s e-book.

How to Achieve Popular Board-and-Batten Siding Looks

One of the biggest go-to trends in exteriors is board-and-batten siding. Due in part to the ongoing popularity of Modern Farmhouse styles, board-and-batten siding brings both charm and a modern edge, allowing some traditional designs to lean a bit more contemporary and fresh.

It’s also versatile: Apply board and batten to the full façade for a true Modern Farmhouse take, or use as an accent on a gable or bump out to add texture and dimension. For a nod to the style without the commitment, consider board-and-batten shutters in a bold color.

Celect Board and Batten Cellular Composite Siding in Carriage Red
Celect Board and Batten Cellular Composite Siding in Carriage Red.

Extensive Board-and-Batten Options

The good news for builders and homeowners alike is that achieving board-and-batten looks is easy and accessible, with a range of options across materials and price points. Many traditional panel siding manufacturers offer board-and-batten profiles, combining authentic looks without the associated maintenance of wood. For example, Exterior Portfolio® Board & Batten vinyl siding features a distinctive vertical pattern profile that conveys the genuine curb appeal of real wood while delivering as a streamlined, contemporary accent. The siding features Chromatix™ technology that helps keep colors from fading. Celect® cellular composite siding offers the look alongside wind resistance up to 210 mph and a Kynar Aquatec coating for enhanced UV protection.

For styles calling for wider or customized spacing than a panel product can provide, it’s easy to create the board-and-batten look with trim, such as TruExterior poly-ash trim, which provides the look of wood alongside high performance and dimensional stability to stand up to extreme weather, ground contact, and insects.

Board-and-batten siding, TruExterior Siding, exterior trends, poly-ash siding
Board and batten siding made with TruExterior poly-ash trim.

Board-and-Batten Installation Considerations

Unlike traditional vinyl and aluminum panel installation, vinyl and aluminum board-and-batten profiles install vertically. Installation instructions may vary from product to product, so be sure to follow manufacturer instructions, including requirements or recommendations for water-resistant barriers. Installers will need to account for some expected expansion and contraction, so the nails should not be driven completely flush.

Pre-planning is important for board-and-batten styles—you can’t just start on one side and go across, otherwise the look may appear off-center or you may end up with a small sliver at the end. Find the wall center and plan your layout accordingly.

Creating Board and Batten Siding With Trim

For wider or custom looks, create the board-and-batten façade using TruExterior Trim. Here’s how:  

• Due to the vertical installation, be sure to use a drainable housewrap between the siding and the wood sheathing to ensure moisture has a pathway to escape the wall cavity.

• Choose 1X, 5/8”, or 5/4” trim thickness. Which one is simply a preference for the homeowner and installer.

• For a traditional board-and-batten look, use 1×12 trimboard as the board and 1×3 trimboard as the batten.

• Find center on the wall and plan your layout to determine if it’s best to start with a batten or a board at that center point; you want to avoid having only a sliver of board when you reach the outer edges.

• Once you’ve chosen center board or center batten, start by installing a board first. If it’s a center board, mark the center of the wall, line up the board, and put it in place using 6D or 8D stainless steel or hot-dipped ring shank nails every 16” (and no less than 3/4” from the board edge) directly into the plywood or OSB.

• Install boards, moving away from center, leaving 3/4” of space between each board.

• After several boards are in place, chalk a single line 7/8” from the edge of the board left or right, which will designate the edge for the batten. This results in a 9-1/2” reveal between each batten.

• Apply a bead of caulk along each side of the batten or under each side of the batten.

• Install the battens using 6D or 8D stainless steel or hot-dipped nails every 16”.

• Repeat the process, moving outward from center.

Keep in mind that paying attention to your layout, and planning it out ahead of time, is important, particularly for small areas like gables. You want the surface to be as symmetrical as possible; if you have uneven board reveals on either side, it will be very noticeable, particularly on smaller surface areas.

Video: Fine Homebuilding Transforms 80-Year-Old Home With Energy, Aesthetic Upgrades

Fine Homebuilding magazine recently completed its 2020-2021 demonstration home, the magazine’s first remodeled show house, in Greenwich, Conn. The 80-year-old house underwent a transformation that included a dramatic modernization in style and a deep energy retrofit.

Fine Homebuilding, TruExterior Siding, poly-ash siding, Channel siding, Shiplap siding

The team updated the home’s layout, opening it up inside and infusing it with a Scandinavian-inspired aesthetic. The team tackled the homeowners’ desire for high performance through a range of details, including air-sealing, insulation, and mechanical systems, with a goal of net-zero energy and Passive House performance.

The original cedar exterior was transformed by TruExterior Shiplap Channel siding in a vertical orientation and painted in Benjamin Moore’s Glacier White to complete the Modern Farmhouse look. TruExterior’s reversible Shiplap-Nickel Gap profile provides a finishing touch on the gable around the balcony door and on the porch ceiling.

Porch of Fine Homebuilding show house featuring TruExterior poly-ash siding

“TruExterior is really unlike any other siding or trim material on the market,” said Fine Homebuilding’s Justin Fink. “It cuts and handles just like wood, but it’s more durable, more temperature stable than PVC, and it takes paint beautifully.”

See the façade installation in this short video:

The façade also features Eldorado Stone masonry veneer installed over a fluid-applied weather-resistive barrier.

TruExterior poly-ash siding and Eldorado Stone on Fine Homebuilding's Connecticut remodel

See all of the building science and aesthetic details of the Fine Homebuilding House to learn on the show home’s website.

TruExterior poly-ash siding on Fine Homebuilding's Connecticut remodel

Trends in Multifamily Exteriors

Whether they own or rent, people want to be proud of where they live and feel good coming home. And whether it’s a custom single-family bungalow or a condo in a three-story multifamily building, first impressions are everything and comfort is paramount. Multifamily dwellers don’t want to sacrifice simply because they share walls and common areas—and savvy developers and builders are responding by paying closer attention to exterior facades and outdoor amenities.

Multi-Textured Facades

Many trends trickle over from single-family design, and that’s certainly the case with the drive toward multi-textured facades. The days of building a 120-unit monotone apartment building with plain block under gray vinyl are fading fast. Like single-family homes, more multifamily properties are emerging with a blend of cladding materials and colors, such as stone and siding, EIFS and stone, or stone and brick. Leveraging multiple textures adds visual interest while adding dimension and differentiation between buildings, while accents and trimwork provide essential finishing touches. The resulting looks lean more home-like and comfortable instead of industrial and one-note.

Three-story multifamily

Versetta Stone and TruExterior Siding offer an ideal combination for achieving these looks. Versetta Stone siding offers the look of stone but with a panelized format that installs like traditional siding along with a built-in rainscreen. Made with poly-ash technology, TruExterior Siding comes in a range of authentic profiles and can be painted any color, including dark hues that look great in multifamily buildings in urban or suburban areas.

Versetta Stone on multifamily building

Along similar lines, we’re seeing variation in dimension, with more balconies, decks, recesses, and bumpouts. Along with adding aesthetic appeal and differentiation, these features can help define individual units.

Because multiple materials also often means multiple trades, it increases the risk of failure in the wall system. Extra caution should be taken to ensure everyone works together and plans ahead collaboratively and schedules thoughtfully to ensure the integrity of the air and water barriers.

In fact, it’s wise to create a small-scale mockup, which will allow for more careful planning and upfront identification of problem areas.

Three-story contemporary multifamily building

Outdoor Amenities

COVID-19 lockdowns were harder on multifamily dwellers, who don’t have spacious yards to escape to, and further brought attention to the need to incorporate outdoor features into condo and apartment buildings. Creative incorporation through balconies, roof decks, courtyards, and pocket parks should be top of mind for builders, as the desire for these spaces isn’t likely to fade even as the pandemic does. Shared outdoor areas with fire pits and lounge seating are an ideal way to not only provide more room to move, but also build a sense of community that may keep tenants in place for longer.

The pandemic also saw a significant increase in pet ownership, so incorporating dog parks or dog-friendly areas also can be beneficial to residents and property managers alike.

On the transportation front, the impact of both electric bikes and electric cars shouldn’t be ignored. Consider not just space for bicycle parking, but covered areas that can protect electric bikes. And factor in spaces in your parking facilities that can accommodate car charging.

Fannie Mae expects the trends that helped multifamily turn around in 2021, following the impact of the pandemic, to continue elevating demand for the next five years. Ensure your properties are at the top of buyers’ and renters’ lists by keeping aesthetics, performance, and occupant comfort top of mind.

Creating multi-textured facades is easy with Boral Building Products’ portfolio of siding, trim, and accessory brands. Learn more here.

The Business Case for Vinyl Siding

Foundry siding

For your homeowner customers, Foundry siding offers the ideal combination of features: The authentic look of cedar without high maintenance. That means years of curb appeal without worry or hassle. But along with these features that make Foundry an easy sell, vinyl siding also offers a host of benefits directly for you, thanks to easy installation, light weight, and low waste.

Here’s a look at the business benefits of vinyl siding, courtesy of the Vinyl Siding Institute.

Ready to get started? Get inspired by Foundry Siding in our Idea Gallery.

Outside and In, Dallas-Area Wedding Venue Balances Rustic and Modern

There’s perhaps no better origin story for a wedding venue than one that begins with its own proposal and labor of love.

Jim and Debra Scano were strolling the land they had owned since 2015. Jim knew he wanted to build something near the pond, and Debra suggested he design them a place to get married. And thus Bella Terra was born.

The stunning venue, located in Gunter, Texas, near Dallas, blends the aesthetics and amenities of a barn setting with an elegant flair and modern sensibilities. Along with the interior volumes one would expect, catering to more intimate gatherings of 150-200 people, the barn offers about 2,000 square feet of porches, providing ample space to move around, find respite, and take in the serene surroundings.

The nearby pond is nestled among gentle rolling hills, a rarity in this typically flat region. They designed the venue to be more wide than tall so as not to disrupt the landscape that inspired its creation. 

Bella Terra stands out from other venues in its appearance, as well. The building eschews the typical red or white color tones for a subtle gray replicated from a barn the Scanos had seen in Vermont that was clad in rough-sawn pine and stained.

The path to achieving the look wasn’t initially easy: They originally used wood siding with stain, but after a year the boards began cupping, warping, and coming off the building. The Scanos searched for a better solution, then set aside two months in early 2021 to re-side the entire exterior.

Jim knew they needed a more robust option, but was grappling with how to achieve the same look as the failing wood—after all, couples had booked the venue based on images and site visits, so a drastic change in appearance could be disastrous. After some research, he found TruExterior Siding from Boral Building Products, a Westlake company, and requested samples from their local rep. Jim tried some techniques and was able to match the look of the wood by spraying on medium brown paint, which mimicked the look of a stain, and then dry-brushing on gray paint.

“Because TruExterior has texture, it took to that really well,” Jim says. “You have to have the highs and lows, so it takes paint a certain way to leave some of the brown behind.”

And while the painted 10-inch Nickel Gap replicated the authentic original look, TruExterior Siding helped ensure the performance issues wouldn’t be repeated. Made with proprietary poly-ash technology, the siding resists rot, decay, and insects while ensuring long-term performance with low maintenance.

“Changing the siding and finding a new solution was such a huge stress,” Jim says. “So far, I couldn’t be more satisfied with the results.”   

Jim’s attention to detail carries throughout the venue. He built the wood bar himself, as well as the chandeliers, helping to save on budget while achieving the form and function required of the vast space. Elegant, contemporary fixtures in the bathrooms, clean lines throughout, and black-framed windows balance the more traditional wood beams and knotty pine walls to achieve the ideal blend of rustic and modern sought after by Dallas brides.

The result is a true labor of love—and, as envisioned, Jim and Debra were the first to be married at Bella Terra when it opened in February 2019.

Explore TruExterior Siding & Trim at truexterior.com. Learn more about Bella Terra at bellaterravenue.com.

Foundry FPX Shingles Offer Easy Maintenance, Easy Installation

Foundry FPX Shingles combine easy installation with low maintenance and eye-catching beauty, making them an ideal cladding option for homeowners and building pros alike.

FoundryFPX Shingles replicate the charm and sophistication of cedar, with a refined grain and authentic shadow lines ideal for gables and other accent areas. FPX’s look is clean and neat for a crisp appearance.

To further enhance the look, Foundry FPX Singles come in five color palette options of more than 30 colors apiece to expertly coordinate with siding hues available from CertainTeed, Exterior Portfolio, Mastic, Royal, and Variform*. (Visit https://foundrysiding.com/foundryfpx/ to download sell sheets and color charts for each brand.)

Like other Foundry products, FPX Shingles are straightforward to install by both contractors and experienced DIYers alike. Along with traditional application instructions, installers are advised to use an offset installation method to ensure shingles have a natural randomized look without vertical lines from course to course. 

The siding carries a Class 1A fire rating and a limited lifetime warranty. As with all Foundry Specialty Siding Products, the innovative PVC material offers low maintenance, ensuring homeowners can spend time enjoying their exterior, not taking care of it.

*Actual colors may vary from printed representations. The Foundry® Specialty Siding and Mid-America® color matches for alternative manufacturer colors listed here are recommendations only. Do not make color selections based on color names alone. Please look at product samples before selecting colors to avoid confusion and color mistakes. Returns cannot be made due to color variances.

Variform® is a registered trademark of Variform, Inc. Royal® is a registered trade mark of Royal Group, Inc. Mastic® is a registered trademark of Mastic Home Exteriors, Inc. CertainTeed® is a registered trademark of CertainTeed Corporation. Exterior Portfolio® is a registered trademark of Royal Building Products, Inc. The Foundry and Mid-America products shown and detailed in the brochures are products of Boral Building Products Inc. and are not affiliated with, endorsed, sponsored, or approved by Variform, Inc.; Mastic Home Exteriors, Inc.; or CertainTeed Corporation. Boral Building Products Inc., Royal Group, Inc., and Royal Building Products are subsidiaries of Westlake Chemical Corporation

What do the 2021 Colors of the Year Mean for Your Exteriors?

One of the most fun reveals at the end of each year are the various Colors of the Year announcements from manufacturers and color experts. They’re a unique reflection of the current moods of the populace and perhaps also a nudge toward where we expect to be headed in the coming 12 months.

This year was no exception, as three of the major Color of the Year announcements seemed to deliver on a similar theme of calm, hope, and grounding.

Here’s a look at the colors, what they symbolize, and how you can leverage them on your homes.

2021 Colors of the Year

For only the second time in 22 years, Pantone selected two Colors of the Year: Ultimate Gray (17-5104) and Illuminating (13-0647). The two hues “highlight how different elements come together to support one another,” the company says. “Practical and rock solid but at the same time warming and optimistic, the union of Pantone 17-5104 Ultimate Gray and Pantone 13-0647 Illuminating is one of strength and positivity. It is a story of color that encapsulates deeper feelings of thoughtfulness with the promise of something sunny and friendly.”

(Check out ArchDaily’s collection of projects featuring similar colors.)

Pantone 2021 Colors of the Year, Iluminating, Ultimate Gray
Pantone’s Illuminating and Ultimate Gray (Image courtesy Pantone)

Sherwin-Williams named Urbane Bronze (SW 7047 (245-C7)), a rich, enveloping gray-brown, its Color of the Year. “Nature at its simplest and most elemental—embodying the richness of the Earth’s stone, metal, and wood—forges a feeling that’s grounded, meditative, and serene,” the paint manufacturer describes. “Let a color rooted in nature create a feeling of calm and bring all you cherish together.”

Sherwin-Williams 2021 Color of the Year, Urbane Bronze
Sherwin-Williams’ Urbane Bronze (Image courtesy Sherwin-Williams)

Paint manufacturer Benjamin Moore went for a richer neutral as well with its selection of Aegean Teal 2136-40, “a blend of blue-green and gray … an intriguing midtone that creates natural harmony,” as its Color of the Year. The hue, along with the other colors in the company’s Color Trends 2021 Palette, celebrates the simple pleasures of home, eliciting a feeling of calming positivity that embraces the viewer in its warmth. The aesthetic feels traditional but much more modern in tone. 

Benjamin Moore’s Aegean Teal (Image courtesy Benjamin Moore)

“Every year, the Colors of the Year reflect what’s happened over the past 12 months, and that is very apparent in this year’s selections,” says Trisha Wagner, National Accounts Manager for Boral Building Products. “People have changed a lot in how they view their surroundings; it’s taken a turn from looking at home from outside in. And these colorscapes demonstrate that.”

How to Apply Trending Colors to the Home Exterior

Wagner points out that home aesthetics are no longer just about curb appeal. With the pandemic, home is also a workspace, vacation space, and much more—so how colors live is important. They need to be much more fluid, with a flow from inside to out, rather than a bold exterior color with a more neutral interior or vice versa.

Trending colors have a feel of the “new neutral,” with a natural tone but with a richness that keeps them feeling modern. In siding, Foundry’s Deep Granite color is one example.

“When I look at new construction projects, it’s not just siding and stone; it’s shake in the gable, multiple textures, but they’re all tonal. Texture and color fold and weave into this calm, serene space,” says Wagner. “It’s the same on the interior. We’re seeing less of the stark contrast, such as a single accent wall in a bold red. It’s more of a blend. It’s not just about one room, it’s about the palette throughout the home.”

Foundry siding
Foundry siding on the second floor blends with the first-floor hues to create a soothing-yet-elegant look.

There’s still a place for bold, but there’s an elegance to it. The bright red is still around, but in a deeper, earthier version that feels calm instead of overpowering. On the exterior, a neutral palette may pair with black-framed windows or a half wall of Versetta Stone’s Northern Ash hue. “That’s the foundation for some of these modern neutrals. We’re not going back to the boring hues. These are elevated, richer, calmer,” Wagner explains.

Versetta Stone in Northern Ash offers an opportunity to add a bold look without feeling overpowering.

The Colors of the Year themselves can be easily weaved into a front door, shutters, and other accents, areas that showcase a trend without having to make a dramatic change.

Atlantic Shutters, Bahama Shutters, green shutters
Shutters and doors offer homeowners an opportunity to experiment with trendy colors, whether the Colors of the Year or a bright green as seen here, without making too much of a commitment.

“Colors are an absolute reflection of where we are this year,” Wagner says. “Color inspires. We shouldn’t be afraid of it, but it has to work with you.”

Ready to take advantage of the latest color trends? Atlantic Shutters can be matched to nearly any color, offering a perfect opportunity to incorporate similar hues to the Colors of the Year. And TruExterior Siding & Trim can be painted any color, making it easy to respond to the latest preferences.

Exterior and Interior Touches Create a Sense of Home for Michigan Foster Children

Boral Building Products, Kleer Lumber, Foundry siding

If not for the parking lot out front and its multiple front doors, it would be hard to tell that the Chippewa County Family Project Teen Foster Home is anything more than a traditional residence. And that’s just the idea.

From inside to out, the 5,500-square-foot house in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is designed to be welcoming for children in the foster care system, just like a permanent home would be. 

“The committee wanted the kids to feel like they have a home, that they’re not just being placed in another facility,” notes Dan Arbic, owner of Arbic Construction in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

foster home, Chippewa County, Foundry siding, Kleer Lumber

Inside, the house is divided into two sides, one for boys and one for girls. Each side has six bedrooms and three bathrooms, a kitchen, and common areas. In the center are offices and a living space for the house parent. 

Arbic also owns a cabinet company, and he put those skills to work creating custom cabinetry and an upgraded hardwood trim package that ensured a cozy warmth to further the home-like feel. In developing the interior, the committee sought the input of local high school students, ensuring that not just adult perspectives were considered. 

On the building’s exterior, the mission continued with an elevation, lines, and styling similar to traditional homes. The façade features all of the current trends, including a soft gray and blue color palette with robust white accents, and a varied façade. Horizontal siding on the lower walls combines with vertical siding on the second level, highlighted by eye-catching blue accent walls and gables clad in Foundry shakes. 

Kleer trim, PVC trim, column wraps

Tapered columns wrapped in bright white Kleer PVC trim and warm stone flank the trio of entrances. The bright white trim is featured throughout the façade, including around the windows. 

Foundry Siding was chosen in part for its ease of installation during the winter construction window; the material stays pliable, even in colder temperatures, ensuring fast installation. 

The contractor also was able to perfectly coordinate the color with the rest of the exterior siding. 

The winter installation also typically doesn’t bode well for keeping trim in pristine condition, but because Kleer trimboards feature TruEDGE technology, they resist dirt and are easy to clean. Plus, Kleer trimboards are wrapped in small-quantity KleerPaks to ensure they stay looking like new from the lumberyard to the jobsite to the walls.

“Foundry was easy to install, and it locked in a lot better,” Arbic says. “And Kleer, in its packaging, we received it without defects or scratches.”

Foundry siding, Kleer Lumber, siding

This was Arbic’s first time using Foundry and Kleer, and based on experiences with other products, he had expected to have to replace some of the siding and trim due to expansion as the colder temperatures and clouds gave way to warmer sun. Instead, “We didn’t have to replace a stitch of trim,” he recalls. “Same thing with the siding—we had zero problems. It went up easy, even though it was no more than 25 degrees when we installed it. Nothing broke, nothing chipped.”

For Arbic, the ease of installation and the discovery of a new go-to exterior material was merely a bonus on top of a fulfilling project that involved so many within the community as they came together to support the needs of local teens.

5 Insights from LBM Journal’s Siding Review

LBM Journal magazine, siding trends

In many ways, it’s business as usual in the siding market—authenticity is in demand, low maintenance is a must, and the Modern Farmhouse continues to reign. And while the pandemic shifted the way most of the industry is doing business, many homeowners are using the extra time at home to improve their exteriors.

LBM Journal’s annual In Depth feature on siding takes a look at the current trends in siding and siding sales. Here’s some of what they found:

Siding Market Remains Strong

While the pandemic has created challenges for so many, it’s also driven many homeowners to embark on improvement projects, particularly as they embrace the home’s role as sanctuary. “During stay-at-home orders, many Americans have been making wish lists for the ways they will have professionals make improvements once that’s allowed in their areas,” Boral Building Products’ Vice President of Sales Jack Delaney told LBM Journal. “Siding replacement is a perfect way to give existing homes an instant facelift.”

Siding also has the distinct advantage of offering outside work, which is isolated from the homeowner and is easier to do safely as the pandemic continues, making it an ideal option to consider for a facelift.

Popular Siding Trends Continue

Multi-textured facades continue to be in demand, manufacturers say, combining traditional siding with stone and accents to help the home stand out and catch the eye.

And despite some predictions that the Modern Farmhouse style has run its course, the look remains popular, as homeowners desire the authenticity blended with clean lines and a contemporary vibe.

“Authenticity has been in demand for the past few years, and we think that desire will only get stronger as Americans look to their homes as a sanctuary,” Delaney said. “The draw of tradition, of the tried-and-true, is likely to continue as homeowners look for any sense of normalcy in these times.”

TruExterior Siding & Trim’s Craftsman Collection, offering the look of wood in seven authentic profiles such as Shiplap and Channel Bevel, is one way to deliver on that preference.

Low Maintenance a Must

The demand for low-maintenance materials is here to stay, as older and younger homeowners alike eschew the idea of painting their exterior every year. Two products to consider are TruExterior poly-ash siding and Foundry Specialty Siding, each offering a combination of durability and little upkeep.

Easy Installation in Demand

As the labor shortage continues, straightforward, speedy installation is key to maintaining schedules and ensuring long-term performance. (Try Versetta Stone stone siding, which has a panelized format that can be installed by traditional carpenters and contractors.) Building pros also are looking for a partner in their suppliers, one that can be both a single source of materials and provide value and knowledge.

Virtual Training Takes Off

With demand still high but face-to-face meetings off the table in many areas of the country, manufacturers have quickly implemented online training sessions. Boral Building Products, for example, has been hosting product knowledge workshops and live installation demonstrations. Check out some recorded classes on our YouTube channel or contact your rep to arrange a live session.

Learn more about the latest siding needs and trends by reading the full LBM Journal article here.

Vertical Siding Installation and Inspiration

exterior inspiration, vertical siding, siding, TruExterior, poly-ash siding

Vertical siding installation is on trend for a reason—blended with horizontal siding or other materials, it’s an ideal way to add dimension and visual interest to the home exterior, particularly as homeowners clamor for multi-textured façades. Vertical applications also are a great way to make accent areas a bit more interesting. 

But installing vertical siding has some nuances both designers and installers should keep in mind. Here are a few things to consider when using TruExterior Siding in vertical installations. 

Choose the right style and profile: Vertical siding is most often used with Channel or V-Rustic profiles, but also can be achieved with Nickel Gap or Shiplap

Complement the home style: Vertical installations are commonly seen on both modern and traditional styles. If used across the full expanse of the façade, the look will decidedly lean modern or, depending on the other design elements, modern farmhouse; traditional exteriors should stick to accents, such as a gable or around an entryway.

Vertical siding, exterior inspiration, TruExterior Siding
Vertical siding made with TruExterior channel siding is ideal for dormers and complements the lines of the metal roofing.

• Follow installation instructions: Keep in mind that vertical installations of TruExterior Siding will require a few different steps than horizontal applications. These include: 

–Make sure to install flashing above windows, doors, and roof lines as usual. 

–If the height of the home requires more than one piece of siding installed vertically, create a belly band trim joint with a piece of 1×4, 1×6, or 1×8 trim (depending on preference) and Z-flashing above and below (see diagram). In vertical applications, the belly band is the best strategy for optimal moisture management and is usually more visually effective versus having random seams. 

–Fasten each piece of TruExterior Siding at the tongue and on the face no less than 3/4″ from the edge and no more than 12″ along the length of both sides of the siding. 

–Install a frieze board trim piece with flashing along the top edges of the siding under the soffits.

Vertical siding, exterior inspiration, siding, TruExterior siding, poly-ash siding
Combining horizontal and vertical siding is a great way to add interest and dimension to larger walls. 

Click here to see more exterior project inspiration featuring TruExterior Siding.

5 Best Practices for Going Bold With Exterior Color

Kleer trim

When used well, bold colors can add a tasteful pop of life to a home’s exterior. When used poorly, you can end up attracting negative attention.

Here are five tips from Trisha Wagner, senior product manager and an authority on color at Boral Building Products, to ensure your use of bold is gorgeous, not gaudy.

1. The best place for bold color is in a home’s decorative details
While it always depends on the house, bold colors are generally best used in a home’s accents, such as the shutters and front door. It’s one of the fastest ways to have a large impact and can completely transform a home’s look and feel. Even better, these details are often the easiest—and most affordable—to change later with either a fresh coat of paint or replacement.

2. Remember to coordinate
One of the first things to consider when picking bold accents is the home’s siding color. You want to select accent colors, such as on the trim, shutters, and front door, that work well with the siding, so consult the color wheel for reference. As explained on Color Matters, “color harmony” can be achieved by choosing analogous colors (three colors side by side on the wheel) or complementary colors (directly opposite each other on the wheel). This can be especially helpful in moving beyond traditional colors. For example, instead of the typical pale yellow, try a deep maize yellow paired with red, coral, or cobalt accents.

3. Pay attention to the entire home exterior
The front of the home isn’t the only area people see. Don’t forget to decorate the back and sides of a house, particularly since outdoor living is more important to buyers than ever before. A bare side or rear home exterior looks and feels unfinished; shutters and accents on these walls will add dimension and complete the look.

4. Find what works for you
If clients are uncertain about incorporating bolder colors, encourage them to experiment with different tones before making their final selection. If a home’s style doesn’t support shutters, consider using just a bold trim color. You can also soften a home’s look by pairing white or cream trim with one or two bold accents. For a less-permanent option,  incorporate bold colors into the landscape design, such as bright-red or -purple flowers and plants, a jewel-toned bird bath, or even a painted fence.

TruuExterior trim bold colors
White can be a bold choice against a neutral cladding.

5. Don’t discount the power of white
In the sea of tans and beiges that dominate today’s exteriors, white becomes a stark contrast that is a bold choice in and of itself. A crisp white trim against a richer-toned cladding is eye-catching and stands out from homes with cream accents.

For more design inspiration, visit www.kleerlumber.com and www.truexterior.com

TruExterior Siding Offers an Easier Approach to Mitered Corners

TruExterior Siding mitered corners

The look of mitered corners never goes out of style: The continuous line around the house delivers a professional, finished appearance, and the overall classic look appeals to American homeowners’ love of historic, timeless exterior facades.

But mitered corners have also always been a challenge when it comes to siding installation. It’s a tough application to master even with wood, and it is extremely difficult to pull off with some fiber cement products. Fiber cement offers a 5/16” lap, which doesn’t leave much material to work with and creates a difficult angle to boot. And some material is simply too brittle for the application.

Mitered Corners with TruExterior

TruExterior Siding, on the other hand, is an ideal option for creating mitered corners. Because it boasts a similar workability to wood, TruExterior can be cut on angles using the same techniques. Unlike fiber cement, TruExterior siding sits flat against the wall, so installers can measure to the corner of the wall, set the saw at 45 degrees, and not worry about other calculations or accommodations.

TruExterior siding mitered corners polyash
TruExterior Siding helps produce flawless mitered corners.

Made with a proprietary blend of polymers and fly ash, TruExterior Siding also offers benefits over wood products for mitered corner applications: Because wood is prone to shrinkage after installation, it may start to gap and require more gluing and pinning. TruExterior Siding is more dimensionally stable and less prone to movement, so it’s easier to put up and can be trusted to stay put without unsightly gaps. In addition, TruExterior does not require sealing of end cuts in the field, further speeding up installation time.

As with all mitered applications, a level playing field is essential. Take your time during installation to keep each row of siding straight and level to ensure corners don’t look crooked or otherwise off-kilter.

Ready to give TruExterior Siding it a try? Contact your local dealer here.

3 Steps to Protecting the Wall Cavity Against Moisture Intrusion

Grayne siding

Protecting against moisture damage not only requires a dependable siding product, but also smart design behind it. Whether through leaks or condensation, water infiltration is nearly impossible to avoid, so taking the steps to eliminate moisture throughout the entire building process is essential.

As all pros know, when water does accumulate, it can wreak havoc on a home’s structure. Wood products, including framing elements, can degrade from excessive water exposure, insulation can soak up moisture, and rot and mold will occur.

How to Avoid Moisture Damage

It is key to have or create an airflow cavity on the back side of the siding you’re installing in addition to proper flashing and weather-resistive barriers (which is designed into most polymer-style siding products like Foundry and Grayne). This stops moisture from getting trapped and causing potential issues during freeze/thaw and/or mold issues.

Here are a few steps to take to help protect the wall cavity from moisture. (Note: Always consult your local building code for the installation requirements for weather-resistive barriers, caulking, etc.)

Step 1: Properly install flashing

Flashing prevents water intrusion around any penetrations through the siding, including channels, corner posts, windows, and vents. Before installing flashing, ensure the wall surface is flat and level.

If you are working on an exterior with existing siding, the best practice is to strip away the old siding for a smooth surface—even when working with vinyl that is designed to be installed directly over wood.

When installing flashing around a window, follow these steps to prevent water leakage:
1. Apply flashing on the underside of the window first.

2. Follow this application with flashing on the sides of the window. Make sure to overlap the bottom flashing.

3. Finally, apply the flashing at the top of the window.

It is crucial that flashing extends past the nailing flanges of any accessory to prevent water infiltration through the opening. The flashing should be long enough to direct water over the nail flange of the last course of siding. This installation method can also be used for applying flashing to other openings, such as electrical outlets and doors.

Flashing around the window

Step 2: Install a weather-resistive barrier

After properly installing flashing, you should next apply a weather-resistive barrier (WRB). Installed between the sheathing and siding, a WRB blocks any water that penetrates the siding and helps it drain away from moisture-sensitive materials like wood structural sheathing and studs.

Not only do WRBs drain water away from the building, they also allow wall assemblies to dry out naturally. Because standard vinyl siding hangs loosely on the sheathing, air is able to flow behind it, creating a drainage gap and method for drying.

To properly install the weather-resistive barrier for maximum protection, the material should be installed shingle fashion by overlapping successive layers behind the exterior finish and over the structural sheathing. Installers should begin installation from the bottom up.

Each overlap should be several inches long. If heavy winds and rain are common in your region, overlap approximately 6 inches at horizontal joints and 8 to 12 inches at vertical joints.

Step 3: Caulk siding correctly

Many professionals rely on caulking to fix mistakes and speed installation time, but caulking can break down over time and eventually even hold water in rather than aid in keeping it out.

To ensure the caulking aids in moisture protection, avoid these three common mistakes:

1. Caulking the top cladding board to trim boards. This traps humidity in the walls.

2. Relying on caulking to fill in gaps. Cut siding to the precise measurements necessary to avoid gaps.

3. Caulking underneath the bottom flange when installing windows. Caulk here will trap moisture inside.

Have more questions about how to properly install Grayne and Foundry siding? View Grayne product resources and Foundry product resources for installation guides, FAQ, and more.

4 Best Practices for Beautiful Siding Installation

Professionals know it’s not only the quality of the product that determines how polished a home’s siding looks, but also how well it is installed.

While having on-site experience can develop the skills for top-notch installation, sometimes even the most experienced builders make mistakes. Here are four tips to ensure your Grayne and Foundry siding projects are beautiful every time.

1. Use the Right Tools
Before you begin the installation process, it’s essential to be equipped with the right tools. Accidentally using the wrong tools can have consequences.

To cut the siding, use either a vinyl siding blade or a fine-toothed blade. If using a fine-toothed blade, be sure to install the blade in reverse for the best cuts.

Other tools to include on your checklist:
• Utility knife
• Caulking gun (to seal J-channel)
• Vinyl siding snips (to cut or trim siding panels)
• Siding removal tool
• Snap lock punch (to cut snap lock tabs and allow cut panels to be snapped into utility trim)
• Nail hole slot punch (to add nail holes if a panel must be face nailed)
• Trim nail punch (to add nailing holes if a panel must be face nailed)

2. Start with a Smooth Surface
If the surface beneath the siding is uneven, even the best siding installation may be compromised. Take appropriate precautions to ensure a smooth, continuous surface.

For new construction, avoid using green lumber as the underlayment, as it typically has high levels of moisture. As the wood dries, it will shrink, leading to cracking and warping. These flaws in the wood can make the siding look uneven and poorly installed.

If you are re-siding a building, furring or complete removal of uneven original siding may be required to create a smooth surface. While this process may seem like a nuisance, it will help to ensure straight, stable replacement siding.

3. Plan for Expansion and Contraction
To accommodate expansion, see siding manufacturers’ guidelines, as many panels install differently.

Always leave a minimum of 1/8″ gap at the nailing hem to accommodate changes from temperature shifts. If you’re installing siding in temperatures of 75 degrees F or higher, lessen the clearance slightly to at least a 1/16″.

vinyl siding installation panel spacing

4. Apply Panels Correctly
One of the most common mistakes installers make when applying panels is driving the head of the fastener tightly against the nail hem. Allow approximately 1/32″ (roughly the thickness of a dime) clearance between the fastener head and the siding nail hem.

During installation, avoid face-nailing or stapling through siding. Face-nailing can not only cause ripples in the siding, but also prevents proper expansion and contraction.

When installing a siding panel, push up from the bottom until the lock engages, then let the panel relax down against the ledge of the previously installed panel. Without stretching the panel, reach up and fasten it into place. Again, be wary of tightness—the panels should not be under tension or compression when they are fastened. Once fastened, allow the butt edge to rest on the top edge of the course below.

vinyl siding installation

To see detailed guides, view our Installation Guides and other product resources:
Grayne: http://grayne.com/resources/

Foundry: http://www.foundrysiding.com/product-resources